Conference Guest Speakers

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AMBASSADOR RICHARD WILLIAMSON

U.S. SPECIAL ENVOY TO SUDAN

Richard Williamson served as US Special Envoy to Sudan from January of 2008 to January of 2009.

 

Mr. Williamson is a practicing partner in the law office of Winston and Strawn. Earlier in the Bush Administration, Williamson, who has broad foreign policy and negotiating experience, served as Ambassador to the United Nations for Special Political Affairs and as Ambassador to the U.N. Commission on Human Rights.


Previously, he served in senior foreign policy positions under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, including as Assistant Secretary of State for International Organizations at the Department of State, and an Assistant to the President for Intergovernmental Affairs in the White House. He also has served as Chairman of the Illinois Republican Party.


Williamson is active in a wide variety of civic organizations, serving on the board of directors of the International Republican Institute, the board of the Committee in Support of Russian Civil Society, a member of the advisory committee for the International Human Rights Center, DePaul University, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.


Williamson received an A.B. cum laude in 1971 from Princeton University. He received a J.D. in 1974 from the University of Virginia School of Law, where he was executive editor of the Virginia Journal of International Law.

 

Contact Information:

Email: rwilliamson@winston.com

 

 

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PRISCILLA A. CLAPP

Priscilla Clapp is a retired Minister-Counselor in the US Foreign Service. She is currently involved in community and academic work with several institutions.

 

During her 30-year career with the US Government, Ms. Clapp served as Chief of Mission at the US Embassy in Burma (1999-2002), Deputy Chief of Mission in the US Embassy in South Africa (1993-96), Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Refugee Programs (1989-1993), Deputy Political Counselor in the US Embassy in Moscow (1986-88), and chief of political-military affairs in the US Embassy in Japan (1981-85). She also worked on the State Department's Policy Planning Staff, in its East Asian, Political Military, and International Organizations Bureaus, and with the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. She speaks Russian, Japanese, French, and some Burmese.  


Prior to government service, Ms. Clapp spent ten years in foreign policy and arms control research, under contract to the MIT Center for International Studies and as a research associate at the Brookings Institution. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

 

Selected Works:

  • Bureaucratic Politics and Foreign Policy (Brookings, 2006) with Morton Halperin
  • Managing an Alliance: the Politics of U.S.-Japanese Relations (Brookings, 1976) with I.M. Destler et al
  • United States-Japanese Relations: the 1970s (Harvard, 1974) with Morton Halperin
  • “Burma’s Long Road to Democracy” (US Institute of Peace, 2007)

Contact Information:

Email: priscilla.clapp@verizon.net

 

 

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JERRY FOWLER

Jerry Fowler is the President of the Save Darfur Coalition (www.savedarfur.org), a multi-million dollar advocacy organization and coalition of 180 member organizations. 

 

Jerry Fowler is a recognized authority on the problem of responding to genocide and related crimes against humanity. Prior to serving as President of the Save Darfur Coalition, Fowler was the founding director of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum's Committee on Conscience. He participated, along with other leading Darfur activists, in an April 2006 White House meeting with President Bush. Fowler also has served on the coalition’s board of directors since its inception.  


He created and hosted Voices on Genocide Prevention, the museum's award-winning interview program and podcast series. His media appearances have included CBS, Fox, National Public Radio, CNN and a host of other national and international outlets. 


Fowler has taught at George Washington University Law School and George Mason University Law School and has been a Scholar-in-Residence at American University's summer Human Rights Institute. In 2006-2007, he was the William F. Podlich Distinguished Visitor at Claremont McKenna College, where he remains a senior research associate at the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights.  He is a graduate of Stanford Law School and Princeton University. From 1983 to 1987, he was stationed in Germany as an officer in the United States Army. From 1993 to 1995, he served as Special Litigation Counsel for the US Department of Justice.

 

Selected Works:

  • "Out of that Darkness: Preventing Genocide in the 21st Century," in Century of Genocide: Eyewitness Accounts and Critical Views (Routledge, 2004)
  • A Good Man in Hell: General Romeo Dallaire and the Rwanda Genocide (short film, director).

Contact Information:

Email: via Joe Maddens at joe@savedarfur.org

 

 

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TIN MAUNG MAUNG THAN

Tin Maung Maung Than, a Myanmar national, is a Senior Fellow at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS).

 

After completing a Masters in nuclear physics at the Rangoon Arts & Science University and a graduate diploma in economic planning at the Rangoon Institute of Economics, he later obtained a Ph.D. in Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. A member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London) and the Association for Asian Studies (USA), he is currently the Associate Editor of the ISEAS journal Contemporary Southeast Asia as well as the ISEAS flagship publication Southeast Asian Affairs and the series editor of ISEAS Working Papers.

 

His research interests include: political economy of development, democratization and civil-military relations in developing countries, human security, nuclear proliferation, Myanmar politics and economics.

 

Selected Works:

  • State Dominance in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Industrialization(Singapore: ISEAS, 2007)
  • Mapping the Contours of Human Security Challenges in Myanmar (Myanmar: State, Society and Ethnicity, eds. N. Ganesan and Kyaw Yin Hlaing, 2007)
  • “Myanmar’s Road to Civilian Rule: Bringing the Constitution Back In” (Opinion Asia, 2008)

Contact Information:

Email: tin@iseas.edu.sg

 

 

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ROBERT ROTBERG

Robert I. Rotberg is Director of the Program on Intrastate Conflict and Conflict Resolution at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  He is also the President of the World Peace Foundation.

 

Professor Rotberg directed the creation of an Index of African Governance in 2007. It ranks all 48 sub-Saharan African countries according to quality of governance. In conjunction, Mo Ibrahim created the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. The results of the Index will help the Ibrahim Prize selection committee choose winners. The Prize will provide pensions for “honest, capable African heads of state” after they leave office.

 

He was a member of the Secretary of State's Advisory Panel on Africa, 2003-2004, and was a Presidential appointee to the Council of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is a trustee of Oberlin College and a visiting professor at the College of Europe in Bruges, Belgium.

 

Previously, he was Professor of Political Science and History at MIT, Academic Vice President of Tufts University, and President of Lafayette College.

Selected Works:

  • China into Africa: Trade and Aid (2008)
  • Worst of the Worst: Dealing with Repressive and Rogue Nations (2007)
  • Ending Autocracy, Enabling Democracy: The Tribulations of Southern Africa 1960-2000 (2002)
  • Peacekeeping and Peace Enforcement in Africa: Methods of Conflict Prevention(2001)
  • “Truth v. Justice: The Morality of Truth Commissions” (2000), “Burma: Prospects for a Democratic Future” (1998)
  • Vigilance and Vengeance: NGOs Preventing Ethnic Conflict in Divided Societies(1996)
  • From Massacres to Genocide: The Media, Public Policy and Humanitarian Crises (1996)

Contact Information:

Email: robert_rotberg@ksg.harvard.edu

 


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JOHN KNAUS

John Knaus, Senior Program Officer for Asia, has worked on the National Endowment Democracy (NED)’s Asia programs since 1997.  He has primary responsibility for the Endowment's programs in mainland Southeast Asia and North Korea.  Mr. Knaus travels throughout Asia to assist and evaluate current NED grantees, consult with regional experts, and develop future programs. Prior to joining the Endowment, Mr. Knaus worked with Tibetan refugees in northern India.  Mr. Knaus earned his B.A. in Political Science from Stanford University and his M.A. with distinction in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.

 

Contact Information:

Email: john@ned.org

 

 

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OMER ISMAIL

Omer Ismail was born in El Fasher, Western Sudan. After graduating from Khartoum University, he worked as research assistant to Dr. Mansour Khalid, the former Minister of Foreign Affairs in Sudan.

 

His work with international relief and development organizations continued until 1988 when he became the Operations Manager for the United Nations Operation Life Line Sudan, the largest relief operation in the world at the time. He fled Sudan after the NIF (National Islamic Front) took power in 1989 and since lived as a refugee in the US.
He returned to the United Nations to serve in Somalia between 1992-1994. In Washington, he helped found the Sudan Democratic Forum, a think tank of Sudanese intellectuals working for the advancement of democracy in Sudan. He is the spokesperson for The Darfur Union, an advocacy group, and the co-founder of Darfur Peace and Development. He currently works as Policy Advisor to several agencies working in crisis management and conflict resolution in Africa and he is a policy fellow at the Kennedy School of Government in the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University.

 

Selected Works:

  • “A Race Against Time in Eastern Chad” (ENOUGH Project, 2007) with John Prendergast
  • “Nations Must Enforce Darfur Peace Agreements” (Boston Globe, 2007) with Colin Thomas-Jensen
  • Appearances and contributions in various media outlets and blogs on the crisis in Darfur, Sudan.

Contact Information:

Email: gamar@att.net

 

 

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JASON QIAN

Cheng (Jason) Qian is the Principal of Global China Practice at LaxSebenius LLC, in charge of developing and managing the firm's negotiation advisory and training business in China and overseeing the Chinese market at large. He specializes in analyzing and advising complex cross-border negotiations, particularly in Sino-foreign joint venture formation, international trade, cross-border investment and acquisitions, and cross-culture communication. He also provides clients with strategic advice on government affairs, regulatory and compliance, dispute resolution, and market-entry/-exit related issues.

 

Qian is a fellow of the Harvard Negotiation Project (HNP) at Harvard Law School and research associate at the Harvard Business School (HBS), where he concentrates on the study of Chinese negotiation methodologies and their applications in contemporary Sino-US negotiations. He has developed HBS cases and other teaching materials on recent Chinese and American business negotiations and published widely on issues related to international conflict. His writings have appeared in the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe, the Philadelphia Inquirer, San Francisco Chronicle, and the Korean Herald.

 

In addition, Qian conducts negotiation training at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government for senior government officials and corporate executives. He also has taught in HBS's Strategic Negotiation Program on Chinese business negotiation.  Qian earned his B. Eng. degree from Xian Jiaotong University, M.B.A. degree from Nanyang Technology University and MIT Sloan School of Management, and M.P.A. degree from Harvard's John. F. Kennedy School of Government.

 

Selected Works:

  • “China’s Winning Olympic Spirit,” The Boston Globe (2008)
  • “Rethinking Beijing’s Burma Policy,” The Bangkok Post (2008)
  • “China’s Delicate Role on Darfur,” The Boston Globe  (2007)
  • “China’s Camp David Moment,” The Boston Globe (2006)
  • “It’s Time for More Strait Talk,” The Philadelphia Inquirer (2006)
  • “China’s Role in North Korea,” The Boston Globe (2005)

Contact Information:

Email: jqian@law.harvard.edu

 

 

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CHRIS STARLING

Lieutenant Colonel Chris Starling is currently stationed in Germany.  He was a National Security Affairs Fellow for 2007-2008 at the Hoover Institution as a representative of the US Marine Corps.

 

Chris graduated from the Virginia Military Institute and was commissioned as an infantry officer in 1988. He has served in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Marine Divisions. He participated in Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and Iraqi Freedom. Most recently he was the Commanding Officer of Battalion Landing Team 2/2, completing his fifth deployment to the Persian Gulf in July 2007.
Other previous assignments include service in the US Pacific Command’s Counter-Drug Inter-Agency Task Force in Alameda, CA and as an Assistant Professor of Military Science at the US Military Academy, West Point. His research at Hoover focused on current and future national security issues and on the expansion of Chinese influence around the world, including in Africa.

 

Selected Works:

  • “Africa: China Calling” (Hoover Digest, 2008)

Contact Information:

Email: christopher.starling@africom.mil

 

 

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HENRY ROWEN

Henry S. Rowen, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, is a professor of public policy and management emeritus at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business and a member of Stanford's Asia/Pacific Research Center.

 

Rowen is an expert on international security, economic development, and high tech industries in the US and Asia. His current research focuses on the rise of Asia in high technologies.

 

He was Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the US Department of Defense from 1989 to 1991. He was also chairman of the National Intelligence Council from 1981 to 1983.

 

Rowen served as president of the RAND Corporation from 1967 to 1972 and was assistant director, US Bureau of the Budget, from 1965 to 1966. From 2001–2004 he served on the Secretary of Defense Policy Advisory Board.


In 2004–05, he served on the Presidential Commission on the Intelligence of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction.

 

Selected Works:

  • Behind East Asian Growth: The Political and Social Foundations of Prosperity (1998)
  • “The Short March: China's Road to Democracy” (National Interest, 1996)
  • “The Tide Underneath the 'Third Wave'” (Journal of Democracy, 1995)
  • Making IT: The Rise of Asia in Information Technologies (2006) with Marguerite Hancock and William Miller

Contact Information:

Email: rowen@hoover.stanford.edu

 

 

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MARK ASHURST

Mark Ashurst is the Director of the Africa Research Institute and a journalist.

 

Mark Ashurst spent six years as the BBC's Africa Business Editor and previously worked as a correspondent in Africa for the Financial Times, The Economist and Newsweek.

 

Mark's radio documentaries for the BBC include “The Congo”, a descent of the famous river; “Helping Ourselves”, an enquiry into fair trade; and “Crossing Continents”, a survey of Zimbabwean migrants in southern Africa. In 1995, he drafted Nelson Mandela's opening address to the Union of African Radio and Television Broadcasters' first congress in Johannesburg, where he worked in the Strategic Planning Unit of the South African Broadcasting Corporation during its transition from apartheid propaganda machine to a public broadcaster.


The Africa Research Institute is a non-partisan think tank based in London with a mission to draw attention to ideas which have worked in Africa and to identify areas where new ideas are needed.


Selected Works:

  • The Day After Mugabe: Prospects for Change in Zimbabwe (Africa Research Institute, 2007) with Gugulethu Moyo.

Contact Information:

Email: mark@africaresearchinstitute.org

 

 

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ORVILLE SCHELL

Orville Schell is the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on US-China Relations at the Asia Society. The Center is working on a number of new projects to strengthen Sino-US relations, including the Initiative on US-China Cooperation on Energy and Climate, a joint partnership with the the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, as well as the Brookings Institution, the National Committee on US-China Relations, Environmental Defense and the Council on Foreign Relations. The Initiative's Co-Chairs have been John Thornton and Steve Chu, now Secretary of Energy.

 

Orville Schell received his B.A. in Far Eastern History from Harvard University and received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Schell served as Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Schell was a Fellow at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism and the recipient of many prizes and fellowships, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Overseas Press Club Award, and the Harvard-Stanford Shorenstein Prize in Asian Journalism.

 

He has worked for the Ford Foundation in Indonesia and covered the war in Indochina for magazines such as The Atlantic Monthly and The New Republic. Since then, he has written widely for many other magazine and newspapers, including The New Yorker, Time Magazine, Harpers, The Nation, The New York Review of Books, Wired, Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, the China Quarterly, Harpers, and The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times.

 

Selected Works:

  • “China’s Quest for Moral Authority” (The Nation, 2008)
  • “The US and China: Common Ground on Climate” (Yale Environment, 2008)
  • Understanding Chinese History (Random House, 2007)
  • The China Reader: The Reform Years (Vintage Books, 1999) with David Shambaugh
  • Mandate of Heaven: A New Generation of Entrepreneurs, Dissidents, Technocrats, and Bohemians Grasp for Power in China (Simon & Schuster, l994)

Contact Information:

Email:  orvilles@asiasoc.org

 

 

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YANG BAOYUN

Yang Baoyun got his Ph.D. of Far East Studies at Paris University VII. Professor of Institute of Afro-Asian Studies of School of International Studies of Peking University; Deputy Director of Centre for Asia-Pacific Studies and Centre for Southeast Asia Studies of Peking University; Vice-President of Association for Southeast Asian Studies of China. He is also Associate Member of LASEMA (Laboratoire Asie du Sud-Est et Monde Austronésien) of CNRS (France).

 

He is specialized on the relationship between China and foreign courtiers, especially with the neighboring and developing countries. His main publications are: Chinese Position on Cambodian Issues (in French, 1989); Southeast Asia: Opportunities and Challenges to China (1994); The Nationalism of Southeast Asian Countries at the Turn of the New Century (2000). A retrospect and prospects for relationship between China end Southeast Asia (2001); “Confidence and prudence”: the Chinese diplomacy at the beginning of XXIe century (in French,2001); The New force report between USA and Russia in the Central Asia after the 11th September (2002); Strengthen regional cooperation, promote peace, prosperity and development of Northeast Asia (2002); Promoting the relationship between China and Vietnam in the field of international cooperation (2003); Several considerations about the China-ASEAN Free Trade Area (in English, 2004); Hand in Hand, the Euro-Asia Seeking for Co-Development: Probing into the Collaborative Mechanism of the Euro-Asia Meetings (2004); Peace, Wealth, Safety: New Development of Relationship Between China and Neighboring Country (2004); The Changes of the Cultural Identity and Value Judgment of the Chinese, Japanese and Korean Students (2005); The Development of Relationship between China and the Third World since the End of Cold War (2005); China and Asia-Europe Cooperation (in English, 2005); China and the Mechanism of the Cooperation in East Asia (in French, 2006); Dragon and Elephant: from Opponent to Partner (2006); The energy and the Geopolitics of China (in French, 2007); Party Politics in Cambodia: Development and Features (2007); Global government: an important field of cooperation between China and Europe to construct  an harmonious world (2007);Studies on the relationship between ASEAN and EU established since 30 years (2007); Developing the relationship between China and Japan, Promoting the cooperation in East Asia (2008), etc.

 

Contact Information:

Email: yangbaoyun@126.com or yangbaoyun@pku.edu.cn

 

 

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JIN CANRONG

Dr. Jin Canrong is a professor and Associate Dean with the School of International Studies at Renmin University of China. He is also a visiting professor at the Gerald Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan, and the "Weilun" Chair Professor at Tsinghua University.

 

His education background includes a B.A. from Shanghai Fudan University in political science, a M.A. from the Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), and a P.h.D. from the School of International Studies at Peking University. Before joining Renmin University, he worked for the Institute of American Studies at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) from 1987 to 2002. He has traveled to over 20 countries or regions so far. His studies focus on American politics (US Congress in particular), American foreign policy, Sino-US relations and China's foreign policy and his main publications include 50 academic papers, 7 books and 5 translated books, including Liberal Tradition in America by Louis Hart; Between Hope and History by President Bill Clinton and Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger. As the first columnist in international politics in the mainland China, Dr. Jin wrote for the column of "Focusing on America" in World Affairs (a bimonthly), from 1995 to 1998. His social positions include: Vice President of China National Association of International Studies; Adviser of the policy planning office at the National People's Congress; Standing Councilor of China Reform Forum, etc.

 

Selected Works:

  • “The US Global Strategy in the Post-Cold War Era and Its Implications for Sino-US Relations: The Chinese Perspective” (Journal of Contemporary China, 2001)
  • “Sino-US Ties Could See Clear Skies at Year’s End” (Straits Times, 2001)

Contact Information:

Email: jincanrong@yahoo.com or jincr@ruc.edu.cn

 

 

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DON KEYSER

Donald W. Keyser retired from the US Department of State in September 2004 after a 32-year career.  He had been a member of the Senior Foreign Service since 1990, and held Washington-based ambassadorial-level assignments 1998-2004.  Throughout his career he focused on US policy toward East Asia, particularly China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan and the Korean Peninsula. Fluent in Chinese and professionally conversant in Japanese, Russian and French, he served three tours at the American Embassy in Beijing, two tours at the American Embassy in Tokyo, and almost a dozen years in relevant domestic assignments.  In the course of his career, Keyser logged extensive domestic and foreign experience in senior management operations, conflict resolution, intelligence operations and analysis, and law enforcement programs and operations.  A Russian language major in college and a Soviet/Russian area studies specialist through M.A. work, Keyser served 1998-99 as Special Negotiator and Ambassador for Regional Conflicts in the Former USSR.   He sought to develop policy initiatives and strategies to resolve three principal conflicts, leading the US delegation in negotiations with four national leaders and three separatist leaders in the Caucasus region.

Keyser earned his B.A. degree Summa Cum Laude, with a dual major in Political Science and Russian Area Studies, from the University of Maryland.  He pursued graduate studies at George Washington University, Washington, D.C., from 1965-67 (Russian area and language focus) and 1970-72 (Chinese area and language focus).   He attended the National War College, Fort McNair, Washington (1988-89), earning a certificate equivalent to an M.S., Military Science; and the National Defense University Capstone Program (summer 1995) for flag-rank military officers and civilians.

 

Selected Works:

  • “Obama Administration and U.S.-ROK Policy Challenges” (Shorenstein APARC, 2009)

Contact Information:

Email: dkeyser@stanford.edu

 

 

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DANIEL SNEIDER

Daniel Sneider is the Associate Director for Research at the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University. He currently directs the center's project on Nationalism and Regionalism and the Divided Memories and Reconciliation project, a three-year comparative study of the formation of historical memory in East Asia. His own research is focused on current US foreign and national security policy in Asia, including work on a diplomatic history of the building of the United States Cold War alliances in Northeast Asia.

 

Sneider was a 2005-06 Pantech Fellow at the Center, and the former foreign affairs columnist of the San Jose Mercury News. His twice-weekly column on foreign affairs, looking at international issues and national security from a West Coast perspective, was syndicated nationally on the Knight Ridder Tribune wire service, reaching about 400 newspapers in North America. He has appeared as a foreign affairs commentator on the Lehrer News Hour and on National Public Radio.


Sneider's writings have appeared in many publications, including the New Republic, National Review, the Far Eastern Economic Review, Time, the International Herald Tribune, the Financial Times, the Dallas Morning News, and the Sacramento Bee. Sneider is a member of the Pacific Council on International Policy, the West Coast affiliate of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also a member of the Institute of Current World Affairs. Sneider holds an M.A. in Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard (1985) and a B.A. in East Asian History from Columbia (1973).


Selected Works:

  • Cross Currents: Regionalism and Nationalism in Northeast Asia (Shorenstein APARC, distributed by Brookings Institution Press, October 2007) co-edited with Gi-Wook Shin
  • “Nuke Negotiations with North Korea: Half Full or Half Empty?: (The Oriental Economist,2008).
  • “Divided Memories: A Progress Report” (Shorenstein APARC) with Gi-Wook Shin and Peter Duus

Contact Information:

Email: dsneider@stanford.edu

 

 

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THOMAS FINGAR

Dr. Thomas Fingar is the Payne Distinguished Lecturer in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. Following this year-long placement he will be the inaugural Oksenberg Rohlen Distinguished Fellow at FSI.

 

From May 2005 through December 2008, he served as the first Deputy Director of National Intelligence for Analysis and, concurrently, as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council.

 

Dr. Fingar served previously as Assistant Secretary of the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (2001-2003), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Analysis (1994-2000), Director of the Office of Analysis for East Asia and the Pacific (1989-1994), and Chief of the China Division (1986-1989).

 

Between 1975 and 1986 he held a number of positions at Stanford University, including Senior Research Associate in the Center for International Security and Arms Control. Dr. Fingar is a graduate of Cornell University (A.B. in Government and History, 1968), and Stanford University (M.A., 1969 and Ph.D., 1977 both in Political Science).

 

Selected Works:

  • China's Quest for Independence: Policy Evolution in the 1970s (Westview Press, 1980)
  • “China's Energy Policies and Resource Development” (US-China Relations Program, Stanford University, 1976)
  • “Energy and Development: China's Strategy for the 1980s”‎ (Northeast Asia-United States Forum on International Policy, 1980)
  • “Energy in China: Paradoxes, Policies, and Prospects‎” (Energy Policy,1983)

Contact Information:

Email: tom.fingar@stanford.edu

 

 

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NICHOLAS J. IMPARATO

Nicholas J. Imparato, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, is a professor of marketing and management at the University of San Francisco. His research involves the intersection of business strategy and public policy.

 

His current research focuses on the attitudes of investor-advisers toward regulatory reform and competitive advantage and, in a separate project, a comparative analysis of industry and advocacy models of corporate human rights policies.

 

During a series of university special leaves of absence, Imparato served in senior corporate positions, including chief operating officer and lead board member of closely held and publicly listed companies. He was instrumental in encouraging the passage of interim legislation in Tanzania in 2007 that resulted in removing it from the list of nations in violation of human rights standards according to reports filed with the United Nations’ Human Rights Council and other groups, a removal with broad economic and political implications. He has given keynote speeches and presentations in more than 30 countries for both government and corporate audiences, particularly on the evolution of globalization and innovation leadership as they affect strategy and best practices.


He was honored with the Tops in Marketing Award by Sales and Marketing Executives International, an award normally given to Fortune 500 CEOs. Other honors include a special award from the Bishop Gassis Sudan Relief Fund for “raising the awareness of the plight of the peoples of Sudan” and the University Distinguished Teacher Award at the University of San Francisco.


Imparato has been interviewed and quoted extensively in numerous publications, including the Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal. He has served on the faculties of Boston College and the University of California at Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. from Bowling Green State University.

 

Contact Information:

Email: imparato@usfca.edu

 

 

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ZVISINEI C. SANDI

Zvisinei C. Sandi is a graduate of the University of Zimbabwe and the New School of Social Research's Democracy and Diversity Summer Institute.

Zvisinei was a journalist in Zimbabwe, where she was assaulted and persecuted for her views. She has successfully won the lawsuit against the state machinery for unfair labor practices and human rights violations.

 

She also taught Social and Political Philosophy at the Zimbabwe Open University as well as Masvingo State University. She was the Secretary General of the human rights watchdog, the Society for Gender Justice. She was elected into the executive council of the lecturers union where she led a strike that virtually paralyzed the State owned University system between February and June of 2007. Because of her pro-democracy activities, she was captured and tortured by the notorious War Veterans militia.

 

Zvisinei is currently a visiting scholar at CDDRL, after initially coming to Stanford as one of our Summer Fellows 2007.

 

Contact Information:

Email: sandi@stanford.edu